thetaoofdana:

Are you so used to being stressed out that it is somewhat normal for you- almost virtuous- to feel tense, pressured and overwhelmed?
If so, you are not alone. And when you learn to relax, it will revolutionize your life…!
Much more here to get you feeling better every day!  xoxo Dana 

thetaoofdana:

Are you so used to being stressed out that it is somewhat normal for you- almost virtuous- to feel tense, pressured and overwhelmed?

If so, you are not alone. And when you learn to relax, it will revolutionize your life…!

Much more here to get you feeling better every day!  xoxo Dana 


In one way or another I’ve always suffered. I didn’t know why exactly. But I do know that I’m not so scared of suffering now. I feel more than I’ve ever felt, and I’ve found someone to feel with. To play with. To love in a way that feels right for me. I hope he knows that I can see that he suffers too. And that I want to love him.
Lee Holloway, Secretary (2002)

(via forever-and-alwayss)


intergalacticcas:

My dash needs more Samira Wiley.

(via turtlesanddragons)


dsogdsg:

sqvad:

trashylittlefuck:

women are considered fragile but I’ve never seen anything as easily wounded as a man’s ego

this post is stupid as hell

case in point 

(via crissle)


chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

and make muthafuckas call home and say, I ain’t coming home no more. 

(via crissle)


theghostofyourliess:

Men’s Rights Activists

theghostofyourliess:

Men’s Rights Activists

(via crissle)


crissle:

9julian2:

thisistheverge:

Powdered alcohol may be coming to a liquor store near you Putting a can of beer in a brown paper bag is about to look like child’s play. A new product that’s somehow been approved by US regulators makes booze as discreet as a packet of sugar. It’s called Palcohol, and it transforms a shot of vodka or rum into a pocketable pouch of powder. Tear it open, add some water, mix, and you’ve got hard liquor.

What a time to be alive.

The American government is trying to kill you.

crissle:

9julian2:

thisistheverge:

Powdered alcohol may be coming to a liquor store near you
Putting a can of beer in a brown paper bag is about to look like child’s play. A new product that’s somehow been approved by US regulators makes booze as discreet as a packet of sugar. It’s called Palcohol, and it transforms a shot of vodka or rum into a pocketable pouch of powder. Tear it open, add some water, mix, and you’ve got hard liquor.

What a time to be alive.

The American government is trying to kill you.


humansofnewyork:

This man was driving me across Tehran yesterday, when I learned that he’d lived for 8 years in America— incidentally on the same STREET as me in Georgia. 
He first crossed into the United States from Mexico— paying $1,500 to be transported across the border. He wanted to go to University and be a dentist, but learned that the idea of America was much more bountiful than the reality. He worked at a factory job for 8 years, without ever being able to get a drivers license. He wasn’t able to find a foothold in society. After 9/11, he said things got much tougher for Middle Eastern immigrants. “I had a great passion for the American people,” he said. “When 9/11 happened, I had no money, so instead I gave my blood.”
Five years ago he spent a night in jail for driving without a license. He decided he was tired of being nervous all the time, and he went all out for a green card. When he was turned down, he returned to Iran. 
His fee for a 45 minute taxi ride across Tehran was only $6. I paid him the rate he’d have received in America, and asked for his photograph. He was the kind of man I most admire. The kind that realizes you get one shot at life, and risks everything to make the best of it. I was sorry it didn’t work out for him.
"It was my destiny," he said. He didn’t sound like he believed his own words though.
"Are you married?" I asked.
"Yes. I met my wife when I returned to Iran."
"Well there you go," I said. 
As I prepared to take his photograph, he made one request: “Don’t photograph me with the taxi,” he said, “it’s a low class job.” 
"It’s not a low class job," I said. "It’s the job of people who take huge risks so their children can be lawyers and surgeons."
(Tehran, Iran)

humansofnewyork:

This man was driving me across Tehran yesterday, when I learned that he’d lived for 8 years in America— incidentally on the same STREET as me in Georgia. 

He first crossed into the United States from Mexico— paying $1,500 to be transported across the border. He wanted to go to University and be a dentist, but learned that the idea of America was much more bountiful than the reality. He worked at a factory job for 8 years, without ever being able to get a drivers license. He wasn’t able to find a foothold in society. After 9/11, he said things got much tougher for Middle Eastern immigrants. “I had a great passion for the American people,” he said. “When 9/11 happened, I had no money, so instead I gave my blood.”

Five years ago he spent a night in jail for driving without a license. He decided he was tired of being nervous all the time, and he went all out for a green card. When he was turned down, he returned to Iran. 

His fee for a 45 minute taxi ride across Tehran was only $6. I paid him the rate he’d have received in America, and asked for his photograph. He was the kind of man I most admire. The kind that realizes you get one shot at life, and risks everything to make the best of it. I was sorry it didn’t work out for him.

"It was my destiny," he said. He didn’t sound like he believed his own words though.

"Are you married?" I asked.

"Yes. I met my wife when I returned to Iran."

"Well there you go," I said. 

As I prepared to take his photograph, he made one request: “Don’t photograph me with the taxi,” he said, “it’s a low class job.” 

"It’s not a low class job," I said. "It’s the job of people who take huge risks so their children can be lawyers and surgeons."

(Tehran, Iran)


humansofnewyork:

He described himself as a “Professional Muse,” which caused me to laugh a bit. But he wasn’t smiling: “I give people guidance,” he said, “I’m going now to meet my first client of the new year.” I didn’t want to ask more questions, because some things are better left a mystery.

humansofnewyork:

He described himself as a “Professional Muse,” which caused me to laugh a bit. But he wasn’t smiling: “I give people guidance,” he said, “I’m going now to meet my first client of the new year.” I didn’t want to ask more questions, because some things are better left a mystery.


humansofnewyork:

"This is not exactly a time of my life that I’d most like to have documented, but fuck it. Go ahead."

humansofnewyork:

"This is not exactly a time of my life that I’d most like to have documented, but fuck it. Go ahead."